close
close

Hageman: Boulder needs to remove gas stations and pavement because fossil fuels are bad

CODY – Combat is alive in Wyoming when it comes to outsiders tampering with coal and the livelihoods of people who make money digging up the ore.

Top politicians in the Cowboy State say the Biden administration and others in Washington, D.C., pushing these policies have created an emergency in Wyoming and are looking for bruises.

Gov. Mark Gordon and U.S. Rep. Harriet Hageman, both Republicans from Wyoming, drew a red line with Washington, D.C.’s increasingly expansive powers it holds through the Bureau of Land Management and Environmental Protection Agency to shut down Wyoming’s coal industry Friday.

The pair delivered a series of impressive speeches to close the annual convention of the Wyoming Mining Association in Cody.

If America’s liberal bastions want a world without fossil fuels, let them lead by example, Hageman said in her fiery speech. She suggested that Boulder, Colorado, could become a test city to be cut off from all fossil fuels and see how well that works for the liberal city that she says lives “in la-la land.”

Let Boulder lead the way

“I absolutely refuse to believe in the idea of ​​global warming and climate change,” Hageman said.

“When they talk about transitioning to (wind and solar energy), when they talk about ending coal production in the Powder River Basin by 2041, when they talk about no longer doing oil and gas leases in (the BLM’s) Rock Springs Field Office When they talk about those things, it’s not hard to figure out what the future holds for us,” she said. “We all know that there are certain things that we absolutely need in a civilized society, and most of those things don’t exist unless we have access to oil, gas and coal.”

Hageman mockingly suggested that the city of Boulder, Colorado, act as a pilot project among urban cities in the US to see how things could go without fossil fuels.

“I’m actually proposing that we start demanding something as an industry and as citizens who want a better life for our children and grandchildren, or at least preserve the American dream that we have. And I don’t think this is out of line,” she said. “If they want to transition 330 million people to a future without fossil fuels, how about starting small? Should we start with a pilot project like Boulder, Colorado? Let’s turn off all their gas stations, let’s turn off all their gas stoves, all their water heaters, all the sidewalks and get them back to dirt roads, right?

Unicorns and fairy dust

Boulder is seen in Colorado as ground zero for decarbonization efforts led by that state’s governor, Jared Polis, who has embraced a roadmap to cut greenhouse gases in half by 2030. The state’s utilities are behind efforts to reduce emissions by 85% by 2040.

“Let’s imagine that Boulder is absolutely the perfect place in the world. They have a lot of sun. They have a lot of wind. They all have this open space. “I think we should fill it with wind turbines and solar panels, and let’s see how well they do in five years,” she said. ‘They wouldn’t survive more than two and a half months.

She labeled Boulder as a place that lives in a kind of Bizarro world where everything happens in reverse reality.

‘We live in a la-la country. We live with unicorns and fairy dust. That doesn’t make sense,” she said.

Boulder Mayor Aaron Brockett, a self-described liberal Democrat, was not immediately available for comment Friday to respond to Hageman’s mockery of his city.

“Wyoming is being targeted by this (Biden) administration. Our Conservatives are being targeted by this government. Our industries are being targeted by this government,” she said. “When you start thinking about the rules and regulations and the things that they’ve passed, it starts to open your eyes to the fact that we’re going to have to fight back with everything we have.”

Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon (R) drew a red line with Washington DC's increasingly expansive powers it holds through the Bureau of Land Management and Environmental Protection Agency to shut down Wyoming's coal industry.  He told the annual meeting of the Wyoming Mining Association in Cody, Wyoming, that he is prepared to fight in court over the Biden administration's decarbonization strategy.
Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon (R) drew a red line with Washington DC’s increasingly expansive powers it holds through the Bureau of Land Management and Environmental Protection Agency to shut down Wyoming’s coal industry. He told the annual meeting of the Wyoming Mining Association in Cody, Wyoming, that he is prepared to fight in court over the Biden administration’s decarbonization strategy. (Pat Maio, Cowboy State Daily)

Riled up

Gordon’s government kicked things off earlier Friday by taking the first step toward finding a major law firm go on the attack with the EPA about the proposed rule that could result in the retirement of Wyoming-based power plants. The EPA rule could derail the state’s efforts to boost investments in carbon-capture equipment at power plants to reduce toxic air emissions. The equipment is needed to extend the life of the power stations.

“This (Biden) administration has a purpose and they missed it. They completely missed it,” Gordon said. “Their goal is to figure out how to move this country forward, and they’ve made all these decisions about what we’re going to do to get there, but they’ve fallen far short of what it’s going to take to get us to the destination of to make this country as strong and independent as we have always been.”

Gordon said he is prepared to fight in court over the Biden administration’s decarbonization strategy.

As of early 2024, Wyoming was involved in about 33 lawsuits challenging the government’s efforts to rid the world of fossil fuels, Gordon said.

“This administration has gone all out and thrown everything at the wall, hoping that some of it will stick,” he said. “We are now approaching 60 lawsuits that we are participating in or leading to ensure that our country can stand on its own two feet.”

Gordon said he recently spoke with BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning about land policies emanating from Washington that are negatively impacting Wyoming.

‘She said, ‘Mark, I think you can relax. I think we’ve done everything,” said Gordon, paraphrasing her conversation that all the “big, important things for Wyoming are out of the way.”

Stunning

He said his jaw dropped at her arrogant observation that everything is going well.

“I said, ‘Maybe you meant to say you’ve done everything you can with Wyoming, and you can’t think of anything else to throw at us,’” he said. “Where this leaves us at this point is that we will continue to help advance Wyoming’s interests in whatever way we can, which are entirely tied to what the mining industry can bring to the state.”

Pat Maio can be reached at [email protected].

Back To Top