Delimit to be free in diet

Estimated reading time 7 mins.

Please see my article, “Don’t listen to me (or even experts): My blanket disclaimer” for a brief discussion of my goal in sharing ideas on health.

A key excerpt: “We all have different bodies, lifestyles, means, likes/dislikes, goals, and many other factors which make up the context in which we are making health decisions. So my attitude is always intended to be not, “This is the right way to eat/work out” or “You should try this.” But rather: “This is what is working for me in this way. How might it apply to you in achieving your goals?””

“I eat whatever I want.” Something to this effect is what I say in a nonchalant way when trying to impress upon people that my diet doesn’t involve the giving up of things I love to eat. Its aloof but matter-of-fact delivery is intended to shock the person while at the same time encouraging them to hope for a moment before I attempt to qualify what I mean. Because of course, I don’t mean that I just eat whatever I want whenever I want.

But on some level in my own mind, that is what I do mean.

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The Obesity Code: A new framework, a new hope

Estimated reading time 35 mins.

Please see my article, “Don’t listen to me (or even experts): My blanket disclaimer” for a brief discussion of my goal in sharing ideas on health.

A key excerpt: “We all have different bodies, lifestyles, means, likes/dislikes, goals, and many other factors which make up the context in which we are making health decisions. So my attitude is always intended to be not, “This is the right way to eat/work out” or “You should try this.” But rather: “This is what is working for me in this way. How might it apply to you in achieving your goals?””

Fat loss is among the top health challenges many people struggle with. For myself, it has been the single biggest challenge among others, requiring so much discipline and effort in various directions. With diet, it has required constantly doing without, eating the things I don’t always want to eat while restricting the things I do want, generally feeling hungry—you know, being “on a diet.” It has also required exercise—lots of time-consuming, grueling exercise. No pain, no gain.

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100 pushups/100 squats/day: Early benefits (and they’re obvious)

Estimated reading time 16 mins.


Please see my article, “Don’t listen to me (or even experts): My blanket disclaimer” for a brief discussion of my goal in sharing ideas on health.

A key excerpt: “We all have different bodies, lifestyles, means, likes/dislikes, goals, and many other factors which make up the context in which we are making health decisions. So my attitude is always intended to be not, “This is the right way to eat/work out” or “You should try this.” But rather: “This is what is working for me in this way. How might it apply to you in achieving your goals?””

We’re all busy. Or at least we ought to be. In any case, most of us find ourselves occupied with something enough making it difficult to find time to hit the gym even a couple times a week. Gearing up and getting there and back itself makes “Annhh, not today” a pretty easy, often necessary, call. Given my own schedule and the conditions I’ve set to make the gym or an outdoor run an on-the-whole enjoyable and life-enhancing rather than dutiful and detracting activity, I go comfortably about twice a week, with one (occasionally two) runs a week. When the university semester starts again next month, that will likely become one gym and one run per week. Last semester, it became regularly only one time at the gym per week.

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